BIOL L303 – Fundamental Genetics
Basic Lecture Syllabus

Lecture Professor:  Dr. Annette Golonka
Office: Bradley 211
Phone: 803-313-7019
Email: golonkam@gwm.sc.edu

Class Meeting Information: Varies from semester to semester (please see course listings for exact time).
Lecture: Meets three times a week for 75 minutes.

Course Requirements & Credit Information:  Prerequisite – Biol 102 or MSCI 311.  Biology major’s course.  General chemistry and basic algebra are strongly recommended.
 
Required Textbooks: 
Klug, W.S., M.R. Cummings, and C.A. Spencer.  2007.  Essentials of Genetics.  6th ed.  Pearson Prentice Hall.  Upper Saddle River, NJ.  ISBN: 0-13-224127-7

Optional Textbook (available in library):
McMillan, V.E.  2001. Writing Papers in the Biological Sciences.  3rd ed.  Bedford/St Martins, Boston, MA.

Blackboard Content:  Hard copies of assignments will be handed out during class.  All lecture assignments WILL be available on Blackboard for printing, if you lose the copy handed out in class.  If you miss a class, you are responsible for printing any missed assignments.

Course Description and Objectives:  Genetics is the study of heredity.  Genetics is a fast growing and exciting field of biology.  It is growing so fast, that genetic technology has led to controversial societal concerns, such as cloning, stem cell research, and genetic engineering.  This course will focus not only on classical and molecular genetics, but also on population and quantitative genetics, and the social issues that have developed around genetic technology.  Topics will include basic principles of transmission, molecular genetics, quantitative inheritance, recombination, gene function and regulation, population genetics, and ethics.

By the end of the course, the student will have:

  1. expanded his/her knowledge and understanding of genetics; 
  2. gained an awareness of the depth and breadth of genetics and associated fields as well as a better understanding of how genetics affects other areas of biology;
  3. read and critically evaluated primary literature sources, thereby increasing critical thinking skills;
  4. increased their knowledge of the ethical and moral issues surrounding some of the controversial applications of genetic technology;
  5. and enhanced communication skills through discussion in lecture as well as writing projects.

Attendance:  According to the USC Academic Bulletin, “absence from more than 10 percent of the scheduled class sessions, whether excused or unexcused, is excessive and the instructor may choose to exact a grade penalty for such absences.”  Please note that USC makes no distinction between “excused” and “unexcused” absences.  This course meets three times a week for lecture.  Being more than 10 minutes late to class or leaving class early will count as an absence.  Thus, if a student misses more than 4 lectures, his or her final grade in the course will be dropped one letter grade.  Continual tardiness may also result in a drop in a student’s grade.

Students are responsible for any work or assignments missed during absences.  If a quiz is missed during lecture, the student will receive a zero for that quiz.  If homework is turned in a day late or after lecture begins, the final grade on that homework will be dropped one letter grade.

Classroom Behavior: Cell phones, pagers, and other similar devices are to be turned off or placed in silent mode during class.  Disrespectful and disruptive behavior will NOT be tolerated in class.  Students should act as responsible citizens at all times, in lecture, and outside the classroom.  Students who do not act responsibly will be asked to leave the classroom.

Readings: Chapters covered during lecture are listed below in the lecture schedule.  To be successful in this course, you 1) need to purchase the current edition of the textbook, and any accompanying supplemental materials, 2) need to keep up with reading assignments, and 3) participate in discussions in lecture and lab.  You may be assigned review questions at the end of the chapters for discussion in class next period.  These questions may appear on the tests.  Material not covered in class but assigned in readings, will be fair game for test material unless otherwise stated in class.  It is the responsibility of the student to read these assignments.  

Exams:  There will be 4 exams (3 during the semester plus the final exam) – short essay, multiple choice, fill-in, true/false.  Exams will not be cumulative and are equally weighted (see point breakdown below).

Research Article Assignments:  There will be 4 research article assignments, each due at the beginning of the class period.  Research article assignments are worth 20% of your final grade.  You will be using the library extensively and will be trained by a librarian in how to find science related articles.  You will choose 4 primary literature articles throughout the semester to read, review, and write a synopsis of the article chosen.  Your first research article assignment will be handed out during the library lecture.

Homework Assignments: There will be 10 homework assignments, each due at the beginning of the class period, unless otherwise stated.  They are worth 20% of your final grade, 2% each.  Homework assignments will be taken from the back of each chapter, with points varying based on length of answer or work needed to answer the question.  Some assignments may be done on Blackboard and some assignments may be done in groups and will be designated as such on the assignment.

Plagiarism & Cheating:  Please review USCL’s policy on plagiarism and cheating in the Student Handbook.  If a student is caught plagiarizing or cheating, at the minimum the student will receive a 0 on that assignment.  Depending on the degree of plagiarism and/or cheating, the student may receive an F in the course and possibly have to face the USC Lancaster Academic Affairs Committee and possible suspension from the university.  A handout will be given out about plagiarism, paraphrasing, and quoting.

Point Breakdown:

Grading Scale:

Exams 1-4

15% each, total 60%

90 – 100% A

70 – 76% C

Article Reports (4 total)

5% each, total 20%

87 – 89% B+

67 – 69% D+

Homework

2% each, total 20%

80 – 86% B

60 – 66% D

 

 

77 – 79% C+

Below 60% F

BIOL L303: Fundamental Genetics
Basic Lecture Syllabus

Lecture schedule may be modified during the semester.  If changes are made, they will be announced in class.

Lecture

Topics

Chapters

1

Introduction to Genetics

1

2

Mitosis and Meiosis I

2-2.2

3

Mitosis and Meiosis II
Homework 1: Ch 2 #3, 5, & 17 *

2.3-2.4

4

Mitosis and Meiosis III

2.4-2.7

5

Mendelian Genetics I
Homework 2: Ch 3  #1, 3, 4 & 7
Homework 1 Due

3-3.3

6

Library session
Choose Research Article 1
Homework 2 Due

 

7

Mendelian Genetics II
Homework 3: Ch 3 #13 & 15

3.4-3.7

8

Mendelian Genetics III
Probability
Homework 4: Ch 3 #17 &  21

3.8-3.9

9

Modifications of Mendelian Ratios I
Homeworks 3 & 4 Due

4-4.6

10

Modifications of Mendelian Ratios II
Article 1 Due
Choose Research Article 2

4.7-4.8

---

Exam I covers lectures 1-8

Ch 1-3

11

Modifications of Mendelian Ratios III

4.9-4.12

12

Modifications of Mendelian Ratios IV
Linkage and Chromosome Mapping in Eukaryotes I
Homework 5:Ch 4 #11, 13, 21, & 23

4.13, 7-7.3

13

Linkage and Chromosome Mapping in Eukaryotes II

7.3-7.5

14

Linkage and Chromosome Mapping in Eukaryotes III Homeworks 5 Due
Homework 6: Ch 7 #13 & 27

7.6-7.9

15

Sex Determination and Sex Chromosomes I

5-5.3

16

Sex Determination and Sex Chromosomes II

5.4-5.7

17

Chromosome Mutations I
Homework 6 Due
Article 2 Due
Choose Research Article 3

6-6.6.5

18

Chromosome Mutations II

6.6-6.11

19

DNA Structure and Analysis I

9-9.5

20

DNA Structure and Analysis II

9.6-9.10

21

DNA Replication and Synthesis I

10-10.3

---

Exam II covers lectures 9-18

Ch 4-7

22

DNA Replication and Synthesis II
Homework 7: Ch 10 #21, 29, Ch 12 #13

10.3-10.8

23

DNA Replication and Synthesis III
The Genetic Code and Transcription I

10
12-12.7

24

The Genetic Code and Transcription II
Homework 8: Ch 13 #17 & 33

12.8-12.13

25

Translation and Proteins I
Homework 7 Due

13-13.2

26

Translation and Proteins II

13.3-13.7

27

Translation and Proteins III
Gene Mutation, DNA Repair, and Transposition I

13.8-13.11
14-14.4

28

Gene Mutation, DNA Repair, and Transposition II Homework 8 Due
Article 3 Due
Choose Research Article 4

14.5-14.7

29

Gene Mutation, DNA Repair, and Transposition III Cell Cycle Regulation and Cancer I

14.8-14.9
16-16.4

30

Cell Cycle Regulation and Cancer II
Chromosome Structure and DNA Sequence Organization I

16.5-16.8
11-11.3

31

Chromosome Structure and DNA Sequence Organization II

11.4-11.6

32

Regulation of Gene Expression I

15-15.8

---

Exam III covers lectures 19-30

Ch 9-10, 12-14, 16

33

Regulation of Gene Expression II

15.9-15.12

34

Recombinant DNA Technology I
Homework 9: Ch 15 #5, Ch 17 #7, 17, & 27

17-17.4

35

Recombinant DNA Technology II

17.4-17.8

36

Genomics
Applications and Ethics of Genetic Engineering I
Article 4 Due

18
19-19.3

37

Applications and Ethics of Genetic Engineering II
Quantitative Genetics
Homework 9 Due
Homework 10: Ch 19 #7, 13, & 25

19.4-19.6
20-21.3

38

Population Genetics I

22-22.4

39

Population Genetics II
Evolutionary Genetics
Homework 10 Due

22.5-22.9
23

 

Final Exam covers lectures 31-39

 

* Note: When working problems out for homework, practice with the questions that are in the back of the book (even numbered questions for the most part).

Statement for Students with Disabilities:  Students who have a documented disability and wish to discuss academic accommodations, may contact me or Disability Services.   

Tips & Comments from Previous Students:

 

This page last updated August 21, 2007 .